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The Prince of Wales tours the Indigenous Australia exhibition at the British Museum

30th April 2015

The Prince of Wales meets guests at the Indigenous Australia Exhibition

The Prince of Wales meets guests at the Indigenous Australia Exhibition. Photo credit: Benedict Johnson

The Prince of Wales toured the new Indigenous Australia exhibition at the British Museum in London tonight.

His Royal Highness visited the museum to explore the Indigenous Australia: enduring civilisation exhibition before meeting guests at a reception. 

The exhibition presents a history of Indigenous Australia through objects, and celebrates the cultural strength and resilience of both Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islanders. Hundreds of different Indigenous groups live across the vast continent of Australia, each with their own defined areas, languages and traditions.

 

 

 

The Prince of Wales tours the Indigenous Australia Exhibition

The Prince of Wales tours the Indigenous Australia Exhibition. Photo credit: Benedict Johnson

A speech by HRH The Prince of Wales at the Indigenous Australia Exhibition at the British Museum

Published on 30th April 2015

Ladies and Gentlemen,

Just a few days ago, in Turkey, I attended the poignant Dawn Service commemorating the centenary of the Anzac landings at Gallipoli.  I visited many of the sacred places of remembrance of those who fought there, including Anzac Cove and Lone Pine, where Australians, including Indigenous Australians, fought and died. 

It seems to me that Anzac remains so important not only in its historical significance, but also in modern Australia’s sense of identity.  So does, in my view, this exhibition and what it represents.  Indeed, it celebrates the extraordinarily rich culture of the indigenous peoples of Australia - preserved, nourished and enriched over tens of thousands of years, despite great loss and change. 

Each and every time I visit Australia, I am reminded of the unique relationship between indigenous peoples and Nature and how this is expressed through art and culture.  When I opened the Australia Exhibition at the Royal Academy nearly two years ago (and, incidentally, I am extremely flattered to have been asked to be Patron of this one!), I was reminded again of this relationship.  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artworks show us different ways to look at Australia through eyes that have clearly known its lands and seas for a very long time. 

Incidentally, my younger son, Harry, has in recent weeks gone walkabout with the Australian Army alongside Aboriginal soldiers who patrol, if you can believe it, nearly 700,000 square miles of land in the Northern Territory and in the Ki ...

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