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1st May 2013

The Prince of Wales with the President of the United Arab Emirates, Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan and an interpretor (center, name not given) during his visit to Clarence House in central London on the second day of his State Visit to the UK

The Prince of Wales with the President of the United Arab Emirates, Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan and an interpretor (center, name not given) during his visit to Clarence House in central London on the second day of his State Visit to the UK

A Gulf leader joked with The Prince of Wales about being made to look short when the pair met today.

Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahyan, president of the United Arab Emirates, shared a light-hearted moment with The Prince during his state visit to Britain.

The President joked that The Prince had made him sit on a sofa which he sank into, and which he said made him look short.

The Sheikh's translator said: "He says you have chosen him a sofa where he sinks in and it makes him look shorter."

The Prince laughed and asked: "Would you rather sit on a higher chair?"

The exchange happened at Clarence House on the last day of the President's two-day state visit.

He was shown displays by The Prince's School of Traditional Arts, in London, and the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.

This was followed by a private meeting with The Prince, who has a long-standing interest in Islamic culture and arts, and has visited the Gulf states many times.

During a recent trip to the Middle East in March, he revealed he has been having Arabic lessons.

The Prince's School of Traditional Arts was established by The Prince in 2004.

The school aims to teach arts and crafts skills which have their roots in all the major faiths. Topics covered include Islamic architecture, icon painting, tile-making, stained glass and mosaic craft. 

The Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies was established in 1985 to encourage a better understanding of the culture and civilisation of Islam and of contemporary Muslim societies, and is a recognised independent centre of Oxford University.

The centre, of which The Prince is Patron, pursues academic excellence through teaching, research and publication, and the cultivation of sustained dialogue and collaboration within the global academic community.