I am thrilled that the collaboration between the Mary Rose Trust and the Ministry of Defence over the last three years has resulted in this final dive and the lifting of some exceptionally important large artifacts from the wreck site.

I am thrilled that the collaboration between the Mary Rose Trust and the Ministry of Defence over the last three years has resulted in this final dive and the lifting of some exceptionally important large artifacts from the wreck site.

Having watched the raising of the hull exactly twenty-three years ago and having been closely engaged with the Mary Rose thereafter, I fully understand the excitement today.

The major timbers from the bow will allow both architects and visitors to understand far better the structure of the Mary Rose, this sole survivor from the Tudor Navy. The mighty anchor is a visible sign of our maritime heritage and looks to be in remarkable condition.

In this ‘Year of the Sea‘, it is particularly gratifying to see that the preparations to introduce the Royal Navy‘s new flagships - the future aircraft carriers - have enabled the safety of the earliest flagship from King Henry VIII‘s navy to be assured.