Ladies and Gentlemen,

As David said I'm afraid I suffer from too much expectation and over ambition so I know the poor people who run this school are run off their feet, but eventually projects get underway and we are only as good, of course, as the support we get and the sponsorship we receive so above all else, this occasion is an opportunity to thank everyone else and all those who are so generous and kind as to understand what the school is trying to do.

Ladies and Gentlemen, I am enormously grateful to everybody for making this huge effort to join the Dumfries House Textiles Festival today. My wife and I were so pleased to have a chance this morning to have a look round, to visit everybody's stalls and hear a little bit about what you're all doing.

Ladies and Gentlemen, I am fully aware that you have been locked in here since 9.30 or something and I suspect that you have been talked to furiously all that time. The last thing you want is another lecture when most of you are probably used to giving lectures rather than having to listen to them.

Master, Wardens, Brother and Sister Liverymen,
Ladies and Gentlemen

Thank you, Master, for your generous words of welcome. It was with enormous pride that I accepted your invitation, last year, to become an Honorary Liveryman of this ancient Worshipful Company and I am hugely honoured to be here today in your magnificent Great Hall (a testament to the art of plastering) to accept this beautiful Livery brooch.

Ladies and Gentlemen,

My wife and I are enormously touched to have been invited to visit you all here, at Corrymeela. IN my case it's paticularly special to be able to come back after all these years. I have such happy memories of my visit here in 1998 which was of course a landmark year in the history of our islands.

Mr. Flanagan, a daoine uaiseala [Ladies and gentlemen],

I must just say, before going any further, what a treat it was to hear real Irish music - one cannot stop one's foot tapping - thank you to the composer, we will treasure this experience for the rest of our lives.

Ladies and gentlemen,

I must say it is a very great pleasure to be with you on this occasion, both my wife and I. I am hugely grateful to the President, Dr Jim Brown, for his very generous and warm words. Today we join all of you at this hallowed university, to which my Great Great Great Grandmother originally gave a Charter all those years ago in 1849, is even more special.

Ladies and Gentlemen,

Just a few days ago, in Turkey, I attended the poignant Dawn Service commemorating the centenary of the Anzac landings at Gallipoli. I visited many of the sacred places of remembrance of those who fought there, including Anzac Cove and Lone Pine, where Australians, including Indigenous Australians, fought and died.

I suspect that many of those here today may be of my own generation, born some thirty years after the end of the 1st World War and whose grandfathers and great uncles may easily have fought or lost their lives in this most bloody of campaigns. When I was young I remember talking to the then Field Marshall Lord Slim about his recollections of the battles in which he was ultimately badly wounded.

I suspect that many of those here today may be of my own generation, born some thirty years after the end of the 1st World War and whose grandfathers and great uncles may easily have fought or lost their lives in this most bloody of campaigns. When I was young I remember talking to the then Field Marshall Lord Slim about his recollections of the battles in which he was ultimately badly wounded.